Humbug

After the giddyness of last week’s blog, a more sober entry this time. On Sunday night – which shows how hard editors work – I received my rejection from the publishing house who’d asked for the full manuscript of Night Shift.

This is no surprise. Some publishers only put out half a dozen books a year, and every author knows that they’re up against pretty stiff competition to be one of those releases. And the rejection itself was nicely phrased:  ‘I found the basic concept of a “base under siege” in the Antarctic in the near future to be very attractive. Unfortunately, I found myself always looking for the “monster” or something that gave a sense of the “other”. The thriller elements of the novel meant that the real antagonists were “off-stage” and, while I liked your main character, I kept on wanting more of a Science-Fiction slant – and I’m aware that is my own personal view.’

So, no hard feelings. And, intellectually, I know I’ve lost nothing. But every time you get your hopes up (no matter how much you tell yourself you won’t) and you get rejected, it’s a blow. And you start to ask yourself – where now? I’ve approached most of the agents who take SFF (as science-fiction & fantasy is referred to in the Twitterverse) in the Writers’ and Artists Yearbook and got nowhere. I’m running out of publishers too.

Just keep swimming…

As an aside, I know I’ve made mistakes with the marketing of my work. I sent it out too soon. My covering letter is constantly evolving. I fear I blew my chances with the publishers and agents I initially submitted to by being too hasty. Live and learn.

And now I fear that once again I’m going to be caught in a cross-genre trap. Melding sci-fi, murder mystery and psychological thriller seemed like a great idea when I was doing the actual writing, but how do I sell it? Can’t be crime – it’s set in the future. But is it sciency enough to get in with the SF crowd?

Grumble.

But let’s be positive. I’ve written a book that I’m sure is of publication standard. My cover letter/pitch is getting me attention (and I’ll blog about submissions at some point in the future). And all the while I’m learning, learning, learning – and also cracking on with new writing. New Gods should be finished this week, possibly even today. And when I say ‘finished’ I mean the first draft, which does not mean ‘finished’ at all. Not that I can do anything with it anyway: as the third in the trilogy, there’s no way of selling it on its own…

I realise that you may be saying ‘but if you’ve got all these problems with publication, why not go out and do it yourself?’ Well… not sure if I’ve got a good answer to that.  Go back through the archive to see my previous posts on self-publishing. The simple answer is that I still want to be published properly. But I’m not sure why – maybe just because I’m a people person. I like the idea of co-operating with editors and art designers and of having deep, involving conversations about books and business with professionals. And it all being about me.

My ego may be uglier than yours, but at least I know when it needs feeding.

You can see why writers get reputations for being a little strange, can’t you? Can you blame then for going a little crazy when, after years and years of being told you’re not good enough, they finally get their moment in the sun?

Anyway, back to the matter in hand. I’ve decided I’m going to keep on going ‘trad’ at least until I’m happy with Australis. If nothing’s happened by then I’ll sit down and have a good long think about bunging it out myself. In the meantime I’ll keep shoving out submissions, haranguing agents and publishers until one of them gives in and, in a desperate plea for mercy, agrees to take me on. My dad had a good attitude to this sort of thing: he says that whenever he got a rejection (he wrote for children, more history than fiction but with the occasional toe-dipping) he sent another three submissions on the same day. Kept him going, and certainly that sort of resolve is what I need right now.

Incidentally, does anyone know if it’s a good idea to resubmit work? How long should you leave it?

Prepare to be harassed once more, all you industry professionals!

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