Phoney war

I am redrafting. Specifically, I am doing my third draft of Oneiromancer, and things are quiet, calm, and sedate. The phoney war is underway.

The first draft was the initial creation: nine or so months of blood, sweat and metaphors. Then came a quick(ish) four-month canter through the text to smooth out the kinks: to eliminate underdeveloped ideas and massage out the obvious imprecisions. Then came the beta-feedback, which was then combined into a new Masterscript (a physical printout much abused and bescribbled). Now I am back at the computer trying to turn all this information into a coherent story.

Editorium End

The Masterscript. Actually an old version as I’m too incompetent to access fresh files

It is slow, steady work. I suppose technically speaking it’s a copy-edit: scenes are being moved, split, merged, rewritten. Points-of-view are changing. Structural changes are afoot. But I am incapable of doing a pass-over without a little bit of line-editation in the margins. Typos – bane of my existence – are being squished and the odd clumsy line rewritten.

This is a dangerous time. Neither fish-nor-fowl, I risk missing big things for the sake of the little and little things for the sake of the big. I guess it’s worth saying that I don’t see this as my final rewrite. This is, after all, only my third draft. Every other piece I’ve completed has gone through at least seven run-throughs. Bitter experience has taught me that a novel is only finished once you’ve released or abandoned it. Five years ago I could think ‘yeah, this is it, this is nigh-on perfect.’ No more.

But back to Oneiromancer. I call this stage the phoney war because I’m still marshalling my troops, assigning reinforcements and strengthening the line. Because I’m still in a state of uncertainty. Aside from a few simplifications to my earliest scenes (removing aliases and a POV that prevented immediate graspage of characters) the changes have so far been small and unthreatening. I’ve decided to ignore calls for more description because I’m not that sort of novelist. Small changes.

(Possibly too small: there is still information that I may want to go back and squeeze within the introduction. But I’ve left this because a) I can’t find the places to put it in and b) I’m unsure whether it’s really necessary. I’ll need another round of feedback to decide me.)

Ahead, though, lurk the greatest changes. There is one particular scene that my betas all demand be moved. Were that it so simple. Moving one scene requires fairly wholesale changes: a flank withdrawn, the cavalry force-marched across bitter terrain to open up a whole new salient. Injuries must be bandaged, wounds cauterised and peg-legs installed. The real work lies before me.

And that’s just this draft. Every change risks an epidemic of blood-sucking typos, of vampiric continuity-errors, of characters suddenly lacking motivation and depth. Every copy-edit requires its own line-edit.

Worse: every draft requires a new phalanx of test-readers. I want to get this novel published. This is perhaps the most commercial work I’ve ever done. I want to find an agent. I want to see this on the shelves.

But you only get one shot with every agent/publisher. This is why beta-readers are so important. You’re never been the best judge of your work and an outside opinion is essential. My team have done a superb job of highlighting the many sins I’ve committed. Now I have to take my time and get this damn thing right.

It might take another year – longer – before I dare launch my assault on the bastions of respectability. The work I’m doing now is essential. The furnaces are burning, the mill-wheel is grinding. Progress is slow, controlled.

Soon the guns will be firing in earnest. But only when I’m ready.

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4 thoughts on “Phoney war

    • Thank you! The initial draft was up at the 140k mark but I cut it down to 133k in the first edit. I really want to get it down still further, but I suspect this next draft will be mostly addition. I tried not to put in too much background (politics, motives, history) in my first pass; turns out that these things are what people actually want

      Liked by 1 person

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